It seems like technology and culture are leaping forward to a place that looks familiar–the past! On top of that, EVERYTHING is being standardized into a homogeneous world in which things look and sound the same. This is what makes the appreciation of all the different cultures in our midst so important. When we standardize things, we lose much of the individuality that made them unique in the first place. On this episode of The Axiom Amnesia Theory, Heit & Cheri talk about a variety of topics–from privacy issues to changing cell phone technology–that are indicative of where our collective culture has been and is going.

Topics discussed include NYC Mayor Bloomberg telling residents their privacy is all but a thing of the past due to surveillance cameras, how easy it forget that many public activities are caught on camera, how cropping a photo can tell a completely different story, the art of writing dialogue in books and movies, people perpetrating and trying to make themselves seem important, cell phones starting to get bigger again, designing a cell phone with a screen that folds up or bendable, the best sized screen for reading books, people starting a new project and thinking that they will be the next big thing, whether you can be “successful” without being popular, people who make beats and give them away to famous artists, free-market liberatarianism with Walmart as an example, standardization of everything in our lives from music to local strip malls–everything looks and sounds the same, Louisiana culture becoming more prominent in Texas, regional culture, and more!

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  • Discussion about NYC Mayor Bloomberg telling residents their privacy is all but a thing of the past.

    Big Brother is watching. Now get used to it!

    Envisioning a future where privacy is a thing of the past, Mayor Bloomberg said Friday it will soon be impossible to escape the watchful eyes of surveillance cameras and even drones in the city.

    He acknowledged privacy concerns, but said “you can’t keep the tides from coming in.”

    “You wait, in five years, the technology is getting better, they’ll be cameras everyplace . . . whether you like it or not,” Bloomberg said.

    The security measures have drawn scorn from some civil libertarians — but Bloomberg scoffed at privacy concerns on his Friday morning program on WOR-AM.

    “The argument against using automation is just this craziness that ‘Oh, it’s Big Brother,’” Bloomberg said. “Get used to it!”
    Source: New York Daily News

  • Discussion about cameras on telephone poles and in drones over the city.
  • The mayor points to the ideal that surveillance measures are good for the public, but they never actually say it.
  • Discussion about the shooting in Lake Charles that was caught on camera. They probably never expected that they were on camera.
  • Discussion about how it’s easy to forget that many of our public activities are caught on camera.
  • Discussion about how photos taken with smartphones automatically document the location where the photo was taken, regardless of whether the location services is turned off on the phone.
  • Discussion about how cropping a photo can tell a completely different story that what was actually happening in the photo.
  • People like good stories, and if you make up a good story, then people will latch on to it–regardless of it being false.
  • Discussion about how real life tends to be quite boring compared to movies, novels, and narratives.
  • Discussion about the art of writing dialogue in books and movies.
  • Discussion about how some of the dialogue scenes in the Malcolm X movie didn’t actually take place the way it was portrayed.
  • Discussion about bad dialogue in movies.
  • Discussion about a scene in “Menace II Society” where the character gets a page and nods excessively.
  • Discussion about people perpetrating and trying to make themselves seem important.
  • Discussion about the early days of the cell phones–how big they were and only using them in emergencies.
  • By the early 2000s, when lots of folks had cell phones, some people would tuck their shirt in only at the area of their belt where their cell phone was clipped (to show off).
  • Discussion about cell phones digressing and getting bigger again–the smaller is no longer the better it seems.
  • Manufacturers have to figure out the sweet spot between the size of a cell phone and a tablet computer. It seems like the size of the Kindle or iPad Mini is optimal right now.
  • Discussion about designing a cell phone with a screen that folds up or bendable.
  • Discussion about the best sized screen for reading books.
  • Discussion about people starting a new project and thinking that they will be the next big thing. This attitude could actually be holding you back.
  • Discussion about whether you can be “successful” without being popular. Think about all of the companies that serve as middle men for manufacturing components. The manufacturers know these suppliers, but chances are that the consumers don’t know them by name.
  • We’re not saying don’t try to go for your dreams. We’re challenging this notion that you need to be at the top of your area to be considered successful.
  • Discussion about the music business and producers making more money than the artists and other players.
  • Discussion about people who make beats and give them away to famous artists.
  • Discussion about free-market liberatarianism, using Walmart as an example.
  • Discussion about how Hip Hop producers and artists used to have a consistent sound coming out of certain areas. Since it’s all been commercialized, you cannot tell where the music comes from anymore.
  • Discussion about the standardization of everything in our lives–from shopping to music. All the strip malls and these new communities look just about the same.
  • Discussion about regional foods.
  • Discussion about Louisiana cuisine and the migration of many people from the state (and their culture) becoming more prominent in Texas.
  • Discussion about the lack of a really distinct culture in many Midwestern cities–most of the people there are only a few generations removed from migrating from the South.
  • Heit discusses being proud of his Louisiana culture and traditions.
  • Discussion about regional culture, and the core of some cultures being the family unit.
  • All cultures come from a mix of different influences.
  • Cheri mentions her recent experience of eating crawfish for the first time.
  • If you like what we do on Axiom Amnesia, please consider making a donation to us directly or by purchasing Heit & Cheri’s album “Improper Conduct.”

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